Comments for VeloTraffic http://velotraffic.com Discussing Cycling from a Traffic Engineer's Point of View Thu, 25 Jul 2013 16:58:33 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.2 Comment on Share the Road? by Elliot Marshall http://velotraffic.com/2011/03/share-the-road/#comment-4671 Elliot Marshall Thu, 25 Jul 2013 16:58:33 +0000 http://www.velotraffic.com/?p=269#comment-4671 As a cyclist I would like the sign to read “Careful: Cyclists on Roadway” or “Caution: Cyclists on Roadway”. I would prefer something similar to these so that it communicates that cyclists can and might take a whole lane, not just share it.

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Comment on Share the Road? by Jim M. http://velotraffic.com/2011/03/share-the-road/#comment-4625 Jim M. Wed, 17 Jul 2013 14:33:39 +0000 http://www.velotraffic.com/?p=269#comment-4625 I prefer to use them only where cyclists should take the lane, or at least it’s uncomfortable to ride alongside traffic.

When New York State first authorized the “Shared Roadway” plaque in 1994, the guidance said it was for use “where highway geometry or other conditions require bicycles to travel within the roadway.”

We interpreted that to mean within the travel lanes, and didn’t use it on roads with shoulders 4 ft or wider.

Alas, when NY adopted the national MUTCD, this guidance didn’t make it into the state supplement.

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Comment on First Look: Mississippi River Regional Trail (MRRT) Central & Pine Bend Bluffs Segments by Reuben http://velotraffic.com/2013/06/mrrt-central-pine-bend-bluffs-segments/#comment-4559 Reuben Thu, 27 Jun 2013 14:53:27 +0000 http://velotraffic.com/?p=818#comment-4559 Yes, I don’t know how this all stacks up in court. Of course, engineers are free to place stop signs wherever they like, even if there are no intersections at all. Ever seen a mid-block stop sign?

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Comment on First Look: Mississippi River Regional Trail (MRRT) Central & Pine Bend Bluffs Segments by Reuben http://velotraffic.com/2013/06/mrrt-central-pine-bend-bluffs-segments/#comment-4558 Reuben Thu, 27 Jun 2013 14:49:28 +0000 http://velotraffic.com/?p=818#comment-4558 Good to hear. This will be a really wonderful trail when it connects all the way to Hastings.

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Comment on First Look: Mississippi River Regional Trail (MRRT) Central & Pine Bend Bluffs Segments by Sean Hayford Oleary http://velotraffic.com/2013/06/mrrt-central-pine-bend-bluffs-segments/#comment-4555 Sean Hayford Oleary Thu, 27 Jun 2013 04:55:10 +0000 http://velotraffic.com/?p=818#comment-4555 The only segment of the MRT I’ve seen is the side-path along East River Road. That looked decidedly unappealing, but the pics here make the other segments look more intriguing.

The stop sign issue seems common for rural trails (and sometimes urban ones). As you note, they’re pretty ineffective, and it seems rather patronizing when engineers take it upon themselves to reinvent right-of-way. I’m very curious how that actually plays out in the case of accident liability. My understanding is that, depending on the circumstance, public bike trails are either regarded as highways or sidewalks. In either case, a vehicle exiting a driveway is obligated to stop/yield. While stop signs designate a through highway, I don’t believe there’s any concept of a through driveway. In fact, I can’t even find any basis to think that cyclists are required to stop at all when it’s not an intersection.

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Comment on First Look: Mississippi River Regional Trail (MRRT) Central & Pine Bend Bluffs Segments by Holly Weik http://velotraffic.com/2013/06/mrrt-central-pine-bend-bluffs-segments/#comment-4535 Holly Weik Tue, 25 Jun 2013 04:59:48 +0000 http://velotraffic.com/?p=818#comment-4535 Let’s go ride it sometime in the next month. Roundtrip should be a long but manageable day.

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Comment on First Look: Mississippi River Regional Trail (MRRT) Central & Pine Bend Bluffs Segments by Dan Farmer http://velotraffic.com/2013/06/mrrt-central-pine-bend-bluffs-segments/#comment-4534 Dan Farmer Tue, 25 Jun 2013 01:02:10 +0000 http://velotraffic.com/?p=818#comment-4534 I was out on the trail for the first time today and noticed the failures that you mentioned. I emailed Chris about it, and he linked me to your excellent article. As I told Chris, somewhere right now, some engineer is saying “Oops! My bad!” LOL!

I agree, though that they have done an excellent job of planning and laying out the trail. Even the steeper sections weren’t all that steep (still fun going down at 20+ mph, though!)

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Comment on First Look: Mississippi River Regional Trail (MRRT) Central & Pine Bend Bluffs Segments by Froggie http://velotraffic.com/2013/06/mrrt-central-pine-bend-bluffs-segments/#comment-4524 Froggie Mon, 24 Jun 2013 04:09:16 +0000 http://velotraffic.com/?p=818#comment-4524 I recently traded E-mails with MnDOT regarding the MRT and USBR 45. They tell me the Inver Grove-to-Hastings section (presumably including what you photographed here) will be completed next year (2014).

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Comment on All the Best US Cycle Tracks are Street Level by Sean Hayford Oleary http://velotraffic.com/2013/05/all-the-best-us-cycle-tracks-are-street-level/#comment-4511 Sean Hayford Oleary Thu, 20 Jun 2013 14:42:10 +0000 http://velotraffic.com/?p=790#comment-4511 I’m surprised you make no mention of the N 1st Ave cycle-track, which seems to be a local design of exasperating street-level design. In addition to making traffic operations more difficult, I think it’s even failed to add subjective safety improvements, since I see only pretty hardcore cyclists using it at all. Most Nice Ride folks are on the sidewalks on Hennepin, or in the traditional bike lanes elsewhere in downtown.

Two other thoughts:

1. I think the aesthetic consideration is important, especially for Washington Avenue. The Vassar Street cycle track does a whole lot more for the street space aesthetically than a million plastic bollards.

2. Copenhagen bike lanes actually mostly go to street level (and often share space with right-turning cars) approaching a major intersection. See this example in downtown Copenhagen. The exact way that they work this design has varied a bit, but even the newest designs still involve the cycle track and street leveling out as they approach a conflict point. One other really important detail I think you left out is that minor intersections are designed more like driveways. It makes the legal right-of-way feel very natural — it’s obvious as a motorist that you’re crossing the bike and pedestrian ways, and the slight grade change and sharp turn forces you to slow down. Unfortunately, we often take the opposite approach, where driveways are built like full-fledged intersections.

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Comment on All the Best US Cycle Tracks are Street Level by Brendan http://velotraffic.com/2013/05/all-the-best-us-cycle-tracks-are-street-level/#comment-4449 Brendan Thu, 30 May 2013 03:48:47 +0000 http://velotraffic.com/?p=790#comment-4449 The other big benefit of street level cycle tracks is that pedestrians will naturally understand that it is not for them, and will unlikely to unknowingly drift into them. This is a big problem with sidewalk level tracks.

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